Arizona voters rejected a ballot measure that would have required a photo ID to vote in person and other personal information to vote by mail. 
Filed Under: Politics

Arizona voters reject new voter photo ID ballot measure

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Arizona voters rejected Proposition 309, a ballot measure that would have created a photo ID requirement to vote in person and other personal information to vote by mail. 

To cast a ballot early and by mail, Proposition 309 requires voters to write their birthdate, government-issued identification number or the last four-digits of the voter’s Social Security number and sign a concealed early ballot affidavit.

It require photo ID to vote in person and no longer allows two forms of non-photo identification. Arizona law had already required a non-photo ID to vote, including utility bills and bank statements, among other options.

The referendum also requires the Arizona Department of Transportation to provide a non-operating identification license free of charge to individuals who request one for the purpose of voting.

Those in favor said voter identification requirements are common sense, ensure the integrity of elections and protect qualified voters.

Opponents argued it was about eliminating votes. They said there was no way for voters who do not fill out the affidavit to know if their ballot is accepted or rejected and fix the problem. There is a cure period for those who fill out the affidavit improperly. They also expressed concern that providing such personal information would be an invasion of privacy.

Nebraska voters are also deciding on a ballot measure that would require a photo ID to vote.

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Arizona voters rejected Proposition 309, a ballot measure that would have created a photo ID requirement to vote in person and other personal information to vote by mail. 

To cast a ballot early and by mail, Proposition 309 requires voters to write their birthdate, government-issued identification number or the last four-digits of the voter’s Social Security number and sign a concealed early ballot affidavit.

It require photo ID to vote in person and no longer allows two forms of non-photo identification. Arizona law had already required a non-photo ID to vote, including utility bills and bank statements, among other options.

The referendum also requires the Arizona Department of Transportation to provide a non-operating identification license free of charge to individuals who request one for the purpose of voting.

Those in favor said voter identification requirements are common sense, ensure the integrity of elections and protect qualified voters.

Opponents argued it was about eliminating votes. They said there was no way for voters who do not fill out the affidavit to know if their ballot is accepted or rejected and fix the problem. There is a cure period for those who fill out the affidavit improperly. They also expressed concern that providing such personal information would be an invasion of privacy.

Nebraska voters are also deciding on a ballot measure that would require a photo ID to vote.

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