Filed Under: Politics

China tech competition bill headed back to House where negotiations await

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The Senate passed the America COMPETES Act of 2022 with a vote of 68 to 28. The bill aims to address America’s competitiveness with China and includes $52 billion to bring semiconductors and chip manufacturing to the United States. 

“I think there’s lots of solutions that we can put before our manufacturers here to help them with their competitiveness on a worldwide basis,” Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA), the Chair of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, said. “That is what the tech director does, the manufacturing USA institutes, the technology hubs, and the technology centers–are all parts of this legislation that would help us move technology out into the world in a faster pace, and work collaboratively to solve these problems that, again, would bring the manufacturing and the supply chain back into the United States of America.”

The version of the bill that passed the Senate is different from the version the House passed in February. The Senate replaced the text of the House’s America COMPETES Act with text of its own bill, the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act. 

Unlike the Senate version, which focuses on developing new technologies, the House version included other issues, like protecting workers’ rights to unionize and climate-focused legislation. 

“The vast majority of the provisions in the COMPETES Act do not do anything to fix these problems and spends [sic] billions we don’t have on Green New Deal policies, like the UN Green Climate Fund, and wild handouts to universities partnering with Communist China and tech companies making record profits,” Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) said. “If Congress would only take up legislation to actually put Americans first and protect families and businesses by eliminating America’s dependence on Communist China and holding it accountable for its crimes, I’ll be the first to vote yes. That’s not what this bill does.”

The House is expected to reject the substituted legislation and request a Senate and House conference to reconcile the differences, according to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. 

Bloomberg reported the two chambers likely won’t come to an agreement until May. 

 

Annie Andersen: THE SENATE HAS PASSED A BILL TO ADDRESS AMERICA’S COMPETITIVENESS WITH CHINA. 

TAKE SOT- Senate

<<”On this vote, the yays are 68, the nays are 28… the bill passes.”>>

Annie Andersen: THE AMERICA COMPETES ACT INCLUDES 52 BILLION DOLLARS TO BRING SEMICONDUCTOR AND CHIP MANUFACTURING BACK TO THE U-S.

IF YOU’RE LIKE ME AND NOT TECH SAVVY AT ALL.. THINK OF A SEMICONDUCTOR LIKE THE HEART BEAT OF TECHNOLOGY… 

HERE’S WHERE THINGS GET WONKY.

THE HOUSE ALREADY PASSED THE AMERICA COMPETES ACT BACK IN FEBRUARY.

TAKE SOT- Nancy Pelosi

<<”The yays are 222, the nays are 210.The bill is passed”>> 

Annie Andersen: UNLIKE THE SENATE VERSION, WHICH FOCUSES ON DEVELOPING NEW TECHNOLOGY.. 

THE HOUSE VERSION FOCUSES ON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. 

IT ALSO INCLUDES PROTECTING RIGHTS TO UNIONIZE AND A 

LOT OF CLIMATE FOCUSED LEGISLATION. 

AND THAT JUST DIDN’T FLY FOR THE MORE CONSERVATIVE SENATE.

BUT THEY ALREADY HAD THEIR OWN PLAN..  THE U.S. Innovation and Competition Act.. AND 

SO VOTED TO REPLACE THE TEXT OF THE HOUSE PASSED BILL WITH THEIR VERSION

– SOUNDS CRAZY, BUT TOTALLY ALLOWED. 

SO NOW THE NEW AMERICA COMPETES ACT GOES BACK TO THE HOUSE..

 WHERE IT’S A FORGONE CONCLUSION IT’S D-O-A.. 

MEANING IT’S BACK TO THE NEGOTIATING TABLE. 

TAKE SOT- Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA) Chair, Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation

<<” that is our desire here in the Senate and hopefully, get this process of going to conference in a response back from the House of Representatives, so we can move forward on reinvigorating America’s supply chain.”>>

Annie Andersen: WE SHOULDN’T HOLD OUR BREATH ON THIS GETTING DONE ANYTIME SOON.. BLOOMBERG REPORTS THE TWO SIDES LIKELY WON’T COME TO AN AGREEMENT UNTIL MAY.

STRAIGHT FROM DC I’M AA 

 

The Senate passed the America COMPETES Act of 2022 with a vote of 68 to 28. The bill aims to address America’s competitiveness with China and includes $52 billion to bring semiconductors and chip manufacturing to the United States. 

“I think there’s lots of solutions that we can put before our manufacturers here to help them with their competitiveness on a worldwide basis,” Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA), the Chair of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, said. “That is what the tech director does, the manufacturing USA institutes, the technology hubs, and the technology centers–are all parts of this legislation that would help us move technology out into the world in a faster pace, and work collaboratively to solve these problems that, again, would bring the manufacturing and the supply chain back into the United States of America.”

The version of the bill that passed the Senate is different from the version the House passed in February. The Senate replaced the text of the House’s America COMPETES Act with text of its own bill, the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act. 

Unlike the Senate version, which focuses on developing new technologies, the House version included other issues, like protecting workers’ rights to unionize and climate-focused legislation. 

“The vast majority of the provisions in the COMPETES Act do not do anything to fix these problems and spends [sic] billions we don’t have on Green New Deal policies, like the UN Green Climate Fund, and wild handouts to universities partnering with Communist China and tech companies making record profits,” Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) said. “If Congress would only take up legislation to actually put Americans first and protect families and businesses by eliminating America’s dependence on Communist China and holding it accountable for its crimes, I’ll be the first to vote yes. That’s not what this bill does.”

The House is expected to reject the substituted legislation and request a Senate and House conference to reconcile the differences, according to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. 

Bloomberg reported the two chambers likely won’t come to an agreement until May. 

 

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