Filed Under: Politics

Mental health a focus as fourth January 6 police officer takes his own life

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The fallout from the January 6 insurrection continues.

Late Monday evening, Washington DC Metro Police confirmed two of its officers who responded to the Capitol that day took their own lives.

The department confirmed that Officers Kyle DeFreytag and Gunther Hashida took their own lives last month. 

DeFreytag joined the police department five years ago. He was just 26 years old.

The confirmation of his death came just hours after Metro Police confirmed Hashida’s death.

According to his obituary, Hashida joined the department in 2003. He would have been 44 on Thursday.

Following his death, lawmakers posted tributes to him.

Four officers who responded to the insurrection have taken their own lives. Capitol Police Officer Howard Liebengood and MPD Officer Jeffrey Smith both died of suicide shortly after January 6.

Post traumatic stress disorder and mental health were focuses of last week’s hearing of the Select Committee on the January 6 attack.

Capitol Police Officer Harry Dunn told the committee he is getting treatment and urged his fellow officers to do the same if they feel they need it.

He testified, “There is absolutely nothing wrong with seeking professional counseling. What we all went through that day was traumatic, and if you are hurting please take advantage of the counseling services that are available to us. I also respectfully ask this Select Committee to review the services available to us and consider whether they are sufficient to meet our needs.”

The CDC calculates that more than 47,000 Americans died from suicide in 2019. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 800-273-8255. There is always someone available at any time of day. 

The fallout from the January 6th insurrection continues.

Late Monday evening, Washington DC metro police confirmed two of its officers who responded to the Capitol that day took their own lives.

The department confirmed that Officers Kyle DeFreytag and Gunther Hashida committed suicide last month. 

Two other officers both died of suicide shortly after January 6 riot. 

Post traumatic stress disorder and mental health was a focus of last week’s hearing of the select committee on the January 6th insurrection. 

Capitol Police officer Harry Dunn told the committee he is getting treatment and urged his fellow officers to do the same if they feel they need it.

(Private First Class Harry Dunn, United States Capitol Police) : <<”There is absolutely nothing wrong with seeking professional counseling. What we all went through that day was traumatic, and if you are hurting please take advantage of the counseling services that are available to us. I also respectfully ask this Select Committee to review the services available to us and consider whether they are sufficient to meet our needs..”>>

More than 500 people have been arrested accused of taking part in the violence that day. A Capitol police officer attacked by protesters died the next day. More than 100 officers were injured. 

If you or someone you love is in need of help, contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 800-273-8255. There is always someone available… at any time of day. 

 

The fallout from the January 6 insurrection continues.

Late Monday evening, Washington DC Metro Police confirmed two of its officers who responded to the Capitol that day took their own lives.

The department confirmed that Officers Kyle DeFreytag and Gunther Hashida took their own lives last month. 

DeFreytag joined the police department five years ago. He was just 26 years old.

The confirmation of his death came just hours after Metro Police confirmed Hashida’s death.

According to his obituary, Hashida joined the department in 2003. He would have been 44 on Thursday.

Following his death, lawmakers posted tributes to him.

Four officers who responded to the insurrection have taken their own lives. Capitol Police Officer Howard Liebengood and MPD Officer Jeffrey Smith both died of suicide shortly after January 6.

Post traumatic stress disorder and mental health were focuses of last week’s hearing of the Select Committee on the January 6 attack.

Capitol Police Officer Harry Dunn told the committee he is getting treatment and urged his fellow officers to do the same if they feel they need it.

He testified, “There is absolutely nothing wrong with seeking professional counseling. What we all went through that day was traumatic, and if you are hurting please take advantage of the counseling services that are available to us. I also respectfully ask this Select Committee to review the services available to us and consider whether they are sufficient to meet our needs.”

The CDC calculates that more than 47,000 Americans died from suicide in 2019. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is 800-273-8255. There is always someone available at any time of day. 

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