Filed Under: Politics

Pelosi attack details; South Korea crowd surge; affirmative action case

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Additional details have been revealed about the man accused of an attack on Paul Pelosi late last week; a crowd surge killed more than 150 people in South Korea; and the Supreme Court is set to look at two affirmative action cases. These stories highlight the Daily Rundown for Monday, Oct. 31, 2022.

Pelosi attack suspect details – David DePape, the man accused of attacking House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) husband Paul in their home Friday, reportedly had zip ties and duct tape at the time of the attack. Police reported DePape also had a list of other people he wanted to target.

Paul Pelosi underwent surgery to repair a skull fracture and serious injuries to his right arm and hands suffered during the attack. In a letter to colleagues, Rep. Pelosi said her husband “continues to improve.”

“Our children, our grandchildren and I are heartbroken and traumatized by the life-threatening attack on our Pop,” Nancy said in the letter. “We are grateful for the quick response of law enforcement and emergency services, and for the life-saving medical care he is receiving.”

South Korea crowd surge – Security in Seoul, South Korea’s Itaewon district was increased Monday night as the investigation into what caused a crowd surge that killed more than 150 people over the weekend. The surge, reminiscent of last year’s Astroworld tragedy, was concentrated in a sloped, narrow alley in the district.  Witnesses and survivors recalled a “hell-like” chaos with people falling on each other like dominoes.

“I go out for Halloween every year, but I couldn’t imagine such a thing happening. Although I don’t know the victims, it doesn’t feel like a far off story,” Lee Jung Min, who was in the neighborhood at the time, said Monday. “I’m still shocked, and I don’t know how to believe or handle this news.”

Supreme Court looks at affirmative action – The future of affirmative action in higher education is on the table as the Supreme Court is set to look into the admissions programs at two of the the nation’s oldest public and private universities Monday. The court will hear challenges to the policies at the University of North Carolina and Harvard.

The Supreme Court has twice upheld race-conscious college admissions programs in the past 19 years. However, the most recent case was still before the court became a 6-3 conservative majority under former President Donald Trump.

The Associated Press and CBS News contributed to this report.

POLICE NOW SUSPECT PAUL PELOSI’S ATTACKER HAD INTENT TO GO AFTER OTHER TARGETS.
A CROWD SURGE IN SOUTH KOREA LEAVES 150 DEAD IN A HALLOWEEN CELEBRATION.
AND THE SUPREME COURT TO RULE ON AFFIRMATIVE ACTION.
GOOD MORNING I’M KARAH RUCKER. HERE’S YOUR DAILY RUNDOWN.
WE GOT OUR FIRST LOOK OVER THE WEEKEND OF THE MAN ARRESTED FOR BREAKING INTO “HOUSE SPEAKER NANCY PELOSI’S” SAN FRANCISCO HOME AND ‘VIOLENTLY ATTACKING’ PAUL PELOSI.
POLICE SAY THE SUSPECT HAD DUCT TAPE AND ZIP TIES IN A BAG.
THEY ALSO SAY THEY’VE DISCOVERED A ‘LIST OF OTHER TARGETS.’
FOR PAUL PELOSI…HE UNDERWENT SURGERY FRIDAY TO REPAIR A SKULL FRACTURE.
NANY PELOSI…SAYING HER FAMILY IS HEARTBROKEN AND TRAUMATIZED.
THE SUSPECT WILL BE ARRAIGNED TOMORROW.
IN SOUTH KOREA…150 PEOPLE ATTENDING A HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL OVER THE WEEKEND WERE TRAMPLED AND KILLED BY A CROWD SURGE…ANOTHER 150 ARE INJURED.
WITNESSES DESCRIBE PEOPLE FALLING OVER EACH OTHER LIKE DOMINOES…
AS THE FORCE OF THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE GATHERED WAS KNOCKING PEOPLE TO THE GROUND.
THIS WEEKEND’S TRAGEDY COMES AS AMERICA MARKS ONE YEAR THIS WEEK SINCE ASTROWORLD’S CROWD SURGE THAT KILLED 10 PEOPLE AT A TRAVIS SCOTT CONCERT.
AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IS ON THE TABLE…
AS THE SUPREME COURT HEARS ARGUMENTS TODAY ON WHETHER COLLEGES ARE ALLOWED TO USE RACE AS A FACTOR FOR ADMISSION INTO THEIR SCHOOLS.
THE SUPREME COURT’S OVERTURNING OF ROE VERSUS WADE NIXED A 50 YEAR PRECEDENT.
IF THE JUSTICES RULE AGAINST THE USE OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IN UNIVERSITIES…IT WOULD MARK THE END TO ANOTHER FOUR-DECADE LONG PRECEDENT.

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Additional details have been revealed about the man accused of an attack on Paul Pelosi late last week; a crowd surge killed more than 150 people in South Korea; and the Supreme Court is set to look at two affirmative action cases. These stories highlight the Daily Rundown for Monday, Oct. 31, 2022.

Pelosi attack suspect details – David DePape, the man accused of attacking House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) husband Paul in their home Friday, reportedly had zip ties and duct tape at the time of the attack. Police reported DePape also had a list of other people he wanted to target.

Paul Pelosi underwent surgery to repair a skull fracture and serious injuries to his right arm and hands suffered during the attack. In a letter to colleagues, Rep. Pelosi said her husband “continues to improve.”

“Our children, our grandchildren and I are heartbroken and traumatized by the life-threatening attack on our Pop,” Nancy said in the letter. “We are grateful for the quick response of law enforcement and emergency services, and for the life-saving medical care he is receiving.”

South Korea crowd surge – Security in Seoul, South Korea’s Itaewon district was increased Monday night as the investigation into what caused a crowd surge that killed more than 150 people over the weekend. The surge, reminiscent of last year’s Astroworld tragedy, was concentrated in a sloped, narrow alley in the district.  Witnesses and survivors recalled a “hell-like” chaos with people falling on each other like dominoes.

“I go out for Halloween every year, but I couldn’t imagine such a thing happening. Although I don’t know the victims, it doesn’t feel like a far off story,” Lee Jung Min, who was in the neighborhood at the time, said Monday. “I’m still shocked, and I don’t know how to believe or handle this news.”

Supreme Court looks at affirmative action – The future of affirmative action in higher education is on the table as the Supreme Court is set to look into the admissions programs at two of the the nation’s oldest public and private universities Monday. The court will hear challenges to the policies at the University of North Carolina and Harvard.

The Supreme Court has twice upheld race-conscious college admissions programs in the past 19 years. However, the most recent case was still before the court became a 6-3 conservative majority under former President Donald Trump.

The Associated Press and CBS News contributed to this report.

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