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Pilot unions reject contract offers from American, United Airlines

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Just this week, two major pilot unions rejected contract offers from American Airlines and United Airlines. The rejections of the United and American Airlines offers came just after Delta Air Line pilots voted to authorize union leaders to call a strike “if necessary” to get a new contract.

On Tuesday, the Air Line Pilots Association announced 94% of nearly 10,000 United pilots voted against a tentative agreement that the union and United reached in June. The deal would have given pilots raises of nearly 15% over 18 months.

“By the company’s own admission, this agreement missed the mark. That’s why both parties agreed to reengage at the bargaining table for a new, improved agreement,” United Master Executive Council Chair Capt. Mike Hamilton said in a statement. “It is vital United management recognizes that an industry-leading contract is required to hire, train, and retain the best pilots in the world for the United Next growth plan to succeed.”

According to the union, the United pilots “will immediately begin a series of informational picketing events to bring the Company back to the bargaining table to finalize an agreement.” The picketing events would not constitute a strike, which cannot happen until federal mediators determine that more talks would be pointless.

On Wednesday, the Allied Pilots Association announced its board voted 15-5 to reject an offer by American that included raises of 19% in three steps over two years. Union spokesman Dennis Tajer said American’s management is focused on keeping pay increases as low as possible and has ignored crew-scheduling changes that the union claims will reduce the number of canceled and delayed flights.

“We are confident a contract the membership will approve – a contract that will improve the reputation of American Airlines with passengers, the investment community, and prospective new hires – is achievable,” the APA Board of Directors said in a statement. “We hope that management feels the same way.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

THE AIRLINES INDUSTRY HAS BEEN ANYTHING BUT SMOOTH SAILING SINCE THE PANDEMIC.
FIRST A STAFFING SHORTAGE….FLIGHT DELAYS ACROSS THEIR BOARDS…
AN UPTICK IN ASSAULTS ON FLIGHT ATTENDANTS…TOO FEW RESOURCES TO MEET A SKYROCKETED DEMAND…
AND NOW…..PILOTS TURNING DOWN WORKER CONTRACTS…
AS AIRLINES GO BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD WITH THEIR UNIONS.
PILOTS WITH AMERICAN AIRLINES JUST DECLINED A NEW CONTRACT THAT INCLUDED A **19 PERCENT RAISE.
IT COMES A DAY AFTER PILOTS WITH **UNITED TURNED DOWN A DEAL THAT INCLUDED A **15 PERCENT RAISE.
DELTA PILOTS TAKING IT A STEP FURTHER…APPROVING THE POSSIBILITY OF A STRIKE IF THEIR AIRLINE DOESN’T MEET THEIR CONTRACT NEEDS.
GIVEN THE ABOVE LAUNDRY LIST OF ISSUES AIRLINES ARE DEALING WITH…
PILOTS MAY HAVE THE UPPER HAND IN NEGOTIATIONS…
KNOWING HOW VALUABLE THEY ARE IN A SHRINKING SPACE.

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Bias Distribution

L 23%
C 55%
R 23%

55% of the sources are Center

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Just this week, two major pilot unions rejected contract offers from American Airlines and United Airlines. The rejections of the United and American Airlines offers came just after Delta Air Line pilots voted to authorize union leaders to call a strike “if necessary” to get a new contract.

On Tuesday, the Air Line Pilots Association announced 94% of nearly 10,000 United pilots voted against a tentative agreement that the union and United reached in June. The deal would have given pilots raises of nearly 15% over 18 months.

“By the company’s own admission, this agreement missed the mark. That’s why both parties agreed to reengage at the bargaining table for a new, improved agreement,” United Master Executive Council Chair Capt. Mike Hamilton said in a statement. “It is vital United management recognizes that an industry-leading contract is required to hire, train, and retain the best pilots in the world for the United Next growth plan to succeed.”

According to the union, the United pilots “will immediately begin a series of informational picketing events to bring the Company back to the bargaining table to finalize an agreement.” The picketing events would not constitute a strike, which cannot happen until federal mediators determine that more talks would be pointless.

On Wednesday, the Allied Pilots Association announced its board voted 15-5 to reject an offer by American that included raises of 19% in three steps over two years. Union spokesman Dennis Tajer said American’s management is focused on keeping pay increases as low as possible and has ignored crew-scheduling changes that the union claims will reduce the number of canceled and delayed flights.

“We are confident a contract the membership will approve – a contract that will improve the reputation of American Airlines with passengers, the investment community, and prospective new hires – is achievable,” the APA Board of Directors said in a statement. “We hope that management feels the same way.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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