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Qatar drawing criticism before 2022 World Cup kicks off

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The 2022 FIFA World Cup is just weeks away and there’s a growing movement to boycott this year’s venue in QatarFrom Australia releasing a collective video statement to Denmark unveiling monochrome kits in protest, Qatar is drawing worldwide criticism over its human rights record.

The country has been accused of exploiting migrant workers from south Asia to build the stadiums that will house this year’s event. According to a human rights group, workers are subject to nationality-based discrimination, illegal recruitment practices, and in some cases, unpaid wages.

In addition, Amnesty International reports that workers often live in dirty and unsafe conditions. Qatari authorities have, in recent years, introduced labor reforms. But human rights groups say there are significant shortcomings.

Right now, migrant workers make up 90% of the workforce in Qatar. Now sponsors, political leaders, athletes and fans are calling on the country to compensate those who were abused.

Qatar’s labor minister recently rejected the idea of a fund, but said the country is open to looking at individual cases that deserve to be corrected.

The FIFA World Cup has already sold nearly 3 million tickets. The first match takes place on Nov. 20.

THE FIFA WORLD CUP IS JUST WEEKS AWAY AND THERE’S A GROWING MOVEMENT TO BOYCOTT THIS YEAR’S VENUE IN QATAR.

FROM THE AUSTRALIA TEAM RELEASING THIS VIDEO STATEMENT, TO DENMARK UNVEILING MONOCHROME KITS IN PROTEST, QATAR IS FACING A LOT OF CRITICISM OVER ITS HUMAN RIGHTS RECORD.

THE COUNTRY’S ACCUSED OF EXPLOITING MIGRANT WORKERS FROM SOUTH ASIA TO BUILD THE STADIUMS THAT’LL HOUSE THIS YEAR’S EVENT.

ACCORDING TO A HUMAN RIGHTS GROUP, WORKERS ARE SUBJECT TO NATIONALITY-BASED DISCRIMINATION, ILLEGAL RECRUITMENT PRACTICES AND, IN SOME CASES, UNPAID WAGES.

IN ADDITION, AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL REPORTS THAT WORKERS OFTEN LIVE IN DIRTY, AND UNSAFE CONDITIONS

QATARI AUTHORITIES HAVE, IN RECENT YEARS, INTRODUCED LABOR REFORMS. BUT HUMAN RIGHTS GROUPS SAY THERE ARE SIGNIFICANT SHORTCOMINGS.

RIGHT NOW MIGRANT WORKERS MAKE UP 90% OF THE WORKFORCE IN QATAR, AND LEADING UP TO THE WORLD CUP CALLS TO COMPENSATE THOSE WHO WERE ABUSED HAVE COME IN FROM SPONSORS, POLITICAL LEADERS, ATHLETES, AND FANS.

DESPITE THAT, QATAR’S LABOR MINISTER RECENTLY REJECTED THE IDEA OF A FUND BUT SAYS THEY’RE OPEN TO LOOKING AT INDIVIDUAL CASES THAT DESERVE TO BE CORRECTED.

THE FIFA WORLD CUP HAS ALREADY SOLD NEARLY 3 MILLION TICKETS. THE FIRST MATCH WILL TAKE OFF NOVEMBER 20TH.

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The 2022 FIFA World Cup is just weeks away and there’s a growing movement to boycott this year’s venue in QatarFrom Australia releasing a collective video statement to Denmark unveiling monochrome kits in protest, Qatar is drawing worldwide criticism over its human rights record.

The country has been accused of exploiting migrant workers from south Asia to build the stadiums that will house this year’s event. According to a human rights group, workers are subject to nationality-based discrimination, illegal recruitment practices, and in some cases, unpaid wages.

In addition, Amnesty International reports that workers often live in dirty and unsafe conditions. Qatari authorities have, in recent years, introduced labor reforms. But human rights groups say there are significant shortcomings.

Right now, migrant workers make up 90% of the workforce in Qatar. Now sponsors, political leaders, athletes and fans are calling on the country to compensate those who were abused.

Qatar’s labor minister recently rejected the idea of a fund, but said the country is open to looking at individual cases that deserve to be corrected.

The FIFA World Cup has already sold nearly 3 million tickets. The first match takes place on Nov. 20.

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