Filed Under: International

“There is no hatred for the people of the US.” But will that change after the Taliban takeover?

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As the fate of the Afghan people hangs in the balance, we spoke to Sher Jan Ahmadzai, the Director of Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Mr. Ahmadzai’s areas of specialty are Afghan governance, tribal dynamics and the relationship between the two.

He says Afghan citizens feel frustrated and betrayed by the decision to pull American troops from their country.

“Women, school children, aspired to become doctors and juniors because they know–they knew–that Americans are with them, standing by them. And these promises, and these guarantees are gone.”

So obviously, there’s some frustration in Afghanistan, towards the us right now. Absolutely. What will the relationship for the US and Afghanistan look like moving forward? Or what should it look like moving forward?

The feeling in Afghanistan, which is a general feeling among the Afghans. They feel betrayed, dismayed, disappointed, and left alone, to the mercy of whoever is controlling them right now.

But the relationship between our people is more valuable. Afghans loved and love America, and the people of America. They thank the Americans for what Americans have done for the last 20 years, there’s no doubt on that part. And they’re gonna expect the same. There is no hatred for the people of the United States. There are frustrations and complaints about our leadership here, our presidents, both President Trump and President Biden, for not sticking with your promises, when American public promised Afghans that they will stand by them. For long there were women, school children aspired to become doctors and juniors because they know, they knew that Americans are with them, standing by them. And these promises, and these guarantees are gone. Because of our political policies and strategies, they definitely are right into what they’re thinking and blaming United States government for what happens in Afghanistan.

As the fate of the Afghan people hangs in the balance, we spoke to Sher Jan Ahmadzai, the Director of Center for Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Mr. Ahmadzai’s areas of specialty are Afghan governance, tribal dynamics and the relationship between the two.

He says Afghan citizens feel frustrated and betrayed by the decision to pull American troops from their country.

“Women, school children, aspired to become doctors and juniors because they know–they knew–that Americans are with them, standing by them. And these promises, and these guarantees are gone.”

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