Filed Under: U.S.

Veteran suicide rate undercalculated by more than 50%, study shows

By ,

According to a new study from America’s Warrior Partnership, veterans are committing suicide at a higher rate than previously thought. The study found about 24 veterans between the ages of 18 and 64 die by suicide each day. That’s more than the 17 daily suicide deaths estimated by Veteran Affairs last year.

In addition, the study found the VA’s numbers don’t account for overdose deaths. Including overdoses, the suicide death toll jumps up to 44 veterans a day. That is more than twice the 17 lives that the VA has reported. In a statement, the president and CEO of America’s Warrior Partnership said the accuracy of data like this needs to be immediately fixed.

“If we are going to make progress toward preventing former service member suicide, we need better data,” Jim Lorraine, President and CEO of AWP, said. “Inaccurate data leads to a misallocation of very valuable resources.”

Researchers also found numerous cases where deceased individuals’ military history was incorrectly reported. Lorraine described the study conducted as one that needs to create significant change. To combat this, AWP is pushing to make it easier to confirm an individual’s veteran status. Lorraine said significant changes are needed to lower the statistics on veteran suicide. They included recommendations to their study Operation Deep Dive.

“The study results can help fix issues surrounding the one-size-fits-all approach, instead enabling a holistic solution that begins at the community level and addresses concerns around housing, employment, financial security, relationships, purpose, physical health, and mental well-being.”

ACCORDING TO A NEW STUDY — VETERANS ARE COMMITTING SUICIDE AT A HIGHER RATE THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT.
THE STUDY FOUND ABOUT 24 VETERANS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 18 AND 64 DIE BY SUICIDE EACH DAY.
THAT’S MORE THAN THE 17 DAILY SUICIDE DEATHS ESTIMATED BY THE V-A LAST YEAR.
IN ADDITION — THE STUDY FOUND THE V-A’S NUMBERS DON’T ACCOUNT FOR OVERDOSE DEATHS — WHICH BRINGS THE DAILY DEATH TOLL UP TO 44 — MORE THAN TWICE THE 17 NUMBER THE V-A REPORTED.
IN A STATEMENT — THE PRESIDENT AND C-E-O OF THE GROUP BEHIND THE STUDY SAID QUOTE “IF WE ARE GOING TO MAKE PROGRESS TOWARD PREVENTING FORMER SERVICE-MEMBER SUICIDE, WE NEED BETTER DATA.
INACCURATE DATA LEADS TO A MISALLOCATION OF VERY VALUABLE RESOURCES.”
RESEARCHERS ALSO FOUND NUMEROUS CASES WHERE DECEASED INDIVIDUALS’ MILITARY HISTORY WAS INCORRECTLY REPORTED.
TO COMBAT THIS — THE GROUP IS PUSHING TO MAKE SIGNIFICANT CHANGES.

According to a new study from America’s Warrior Partnership, veterans are committing suicide at a higher rate than previously thought. The study found about 24 veterans between the ages of 18 and 64 die by suicide each day. That’s more than the 17 daily suicide deaths estimated by Veteran Affairs last year.

In addition, the study found the VA’s numbers don’t account for overdose deaths. Including overdoses, the suicide death toll jumps up to 44 veterans a day. That is more than twice the 17 lives that the VA has reported. In a statement, the president and CEO of America’s Warrior Partnership said the accuracy of data like this needs to be immediately fixed.

“If we are going to make progress toward preventing former service member suicide, we need better data,” Jim Lorraine, President and CEO of AWP, said. “Inaccurate data leads to a misallocation of very valuable resources.”

Researchers also found numerous cases where deceased individuals’ military history was incorrectly reported. Lorraine described the study conducted as one that needs to create significant change. To combat this, AWP is pushing to make it easier to confirm an individual’s veteran status. Lorraine said significant changes are needed to lower the statistics on veteran suicide. They included recommendations to their study Operation Deep Dive.

“The study results can help fix issues surrounding the one-size-fits-all approach, instead enabling a holistic solution that begins at the community level and addresses concerns around housing, employment, financial security, relationships, purpose, physical health, and mental well-being.”

Get ready to rate in…

Community Rating

Community ratings are revealed after you rate the story.

lock

Watch the report to unlock rating

Rate the bias

Keep us honest! Let us know if you thought this video was neutral or biased.

Comments are still pending approval. Rate this story to add your own thoughts below.