Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene testified during a case challenging her reelection, and if she loses, she'll be taken off the ballot.
Filed Under: Politics

Voters challenge Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene’s reelection in court

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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) testified Friday during a case challenging her reelection, as voters in Greene’s northwestern Georgia district are suing to keep her off the ballot. The suit claims she helped facilitate the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol and is therefore ineligible. 

The challengers are basing their argument on a section of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution which states members of Congress cannot engage “in insurrection or rebellion”. 

After the hearings, Judge Charles R. Beaudrot will send his findings to Secretary of State Brad Raffensberger (R), who will determine if Greene can run to keep her seat in Georgia’s primary on May 24. 

Rep. Greene has repeatedly denied that she aided or engaged in insurrection, and she repeated those denials during her testimony Friday. Greene also said she had no knowledge of any attempt to stop the counting of votes. Andrew Celli, the attorney representing the voters who are suing Greene, spent hours questioning her on the stand Friday.

“And those people were trying to interfere with the lawful process of counting the votes for the Electoral College, right,” Celli asked Greene, referring to the rioters who broke into the Capitol building. 

“They stopped the electoral count. Yes,” Greene replied. 

Celli then asked her if the people who did that are enemies of the constitution. 

“I don’t know if it defines it that way,” Green answered. 

The attorneys for the plaintiffs also played video in which Greene said power cannot be transferred “peacefully” the way Joe Biden wanted because the election was “stolen”. Greene also urged Donald Trump supporters to show up to D.C. on Jan. 6, and she estimated one million people would attend.

The congresswoman argued these videos were taken out of context, edited, and from other people’s social media pages.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) testified Friday during a case challenging her reelection, as voters in Greene’s northwestern Georgia district are suing to keep her off the ballot. The suit claims she helped facilitate the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol and is therefore ineligible. 

The challengers are basing their argument on a section of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution which states members of Congress cannot engage “in insurrection or rebellion”. 

After the hearings, Judge Charles R. Beaudrot will send his findings to Secretary of State Brad Raffensberger (R), who will determine if Greene can run to keep her seat in Georgia’s primary on May 24. 

Rep. Greene has repeatedly denied that she aided or engaged in insurrection, and she repeated those denials during her testimony Friday. Greene also said she had no knowledge of any attempt to stop the counting of votes. Andrew Celli, the attorney representing the voters who are suing Greene, spent hours questioning her on the stand Friday.

“And those people were trying to interfere with the lawful process of counting the votes for the Electoral College, right,” Celli asked Greene, referring to the rioters who broke into the Capitol building. 

“They stopped the electoral count. Yes,” Greene replied. 

Celli then asked her if the people who did that are enemies of the constitution. 

“I don’t know if it defines it that way,” Green answered. 

The attorneys for the plaintiffs also played video in which Greene said power cannot be transferred “peacefully” the way Joe Biden wanted because the election was “stolen”. Greene also urged Donald Trump supporters to show up to D.C. on Jan. 6, and she estimated one million people would attend.

The congresswoman argued these videos were taken out of context, edited, and from other people’s social media pages.

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