Filed Under: International

World rushes to condemn, sanction Russia over invasion of Ukraine

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Residents and leaders of the world responded to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine with near universal condemnation. Protests formed at Russian embassies around the world Thursday. According to OVD-Info, a rights group that tracks political arrests, over 1,600 protesters in Russia have been arrested. Over 900 of those have been arrested in Moscow.

“My message to Russians is that this is the time to stand up, to wake up, to go to protests,” protester Oksana Yanshyna said at the Russian embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel. “I know it could be scary, but this is the only thing you can do, and this is the only thing that will stop him.”

The prime minister of Hungary, which shares a border with Ukraine, laid blame for the tensions squarely on Russia for the first time. In addition, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has made a nationally televised address vowing that Russian President Vladimir Putin “will not win.”

“The citizens in Ukraine want democracy and freedom, and Europe’s future will be one of peace and freedom,” Chancellor Scholz said. “We will make sure of that, together with our friends and partners.”

A senior U.S. official told the Associated Press under the condition of anonymity the U.N. Security Council is expected to vote Friday on a resolution condemning Russia in the strongest terms possible. The council is also expected to demand the immediate withdrawal of all its forces. While Russia is expected to veto the resolution, the official said it is important to underscore Russia’s international isolation.

With the condemnation came more sanctions against Russia. Great Britain announced a round of financial restrictions and export controls. Canada announced sanctions that will target 58 people and entities, including members of Russia’s elite, their families and major Russian banks. President Joe Biden also announced sanctions similar to the ones in Great Britain and Canada.

“We have purposefully designed these sanctions to maximize the long term impact on Russia and to minimize the impact on the United States and our allies,” President Biden said. “We will limit Russia’s ability to do business in dollars, euros, pounds and yen to be part of the global economy… we’re going to stunt the ability of to finance and grow Russia… and we’re going to pare their ability to compete in high-tech 21st century economy. “

Oksana Markarova // Ukrainian Ambassador to the U.S.: “So we do not expect anyone to fight for us, but we expect all the help and all the response the West can send to us.”
Gwen Baumgardner: WORLD LEADERS CONTINUE TO RESPOND…FOLLOWING RUSSIA’S INVASION OF UKRAINE.
THE COUNTRY’S AMBASSADOR CALLING ON U-S SUPPORT JUST HOURS AFTER RUSSIA’S MILITARY OPERATION BEGAN.
AND HELP APPEARS TO BE ON THE WAY.
A SENIOR U-S OFFICIAL TELLING AP NEWS, THE U-N SECURITY COUNCIL IS EXPECTED TO VOTE ON A RESOLUTION CONDEMNING RUSSIA AND DEMANDING THE IMMEDIATE WITHDRAWAL OF ALL ITS FORCES.
WORLD LEADERS IN THE U-S — CANADA AND GREAT BRITAIN — PROMISING TO SLAP MORE SANCTIONS ON RUSSIA.
Boris Johnson // British Prime Minister: “Now we have a clear mission; diplomatically, politically, economically and eventually militarily, this hideous and barbarous venture of Vladimir Putin must end in failure.”
Gwen Baumgardner: AND IT’S NOT JUST LEADERS SPEAKING OUT.
WE’RE ALSO WITNESSING PRO-UKRAINE PROTESTS OUTSIDE RUSSIAN EMBASSIES AROUND THE WORLD.
Oksana Yanshyna // Protester: “My message to Russians is that this is the time to stand up, to wake up, to go to protests. I know it could be scary, but this is the only thing you can do, and this is the only thing that will stop him.”

Residents and leaders of the world responded to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine with near universal condemnation. Protests formed at Russian embassies around the world Thursday. According to OVD-Info, a rights group that tracks political arrests, over 1,600 protesters in Russia have been arrested. Over 900 of those have been arrested in Moscow.

“My message to Russians is that this is the time to stand up, to wake up, to go to protests,” protester Oksana Yanshyna said at the Russian embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel. “I know it could be scary, but this is the only thing you can do, and this is the only thing that will stop him.”

The prime minister of Hungary, which shares a border with Ukraine, laid blame for the tensions squarely on Russia for the first time. In addition, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has made a nationally televised address vowing that Russian President Vladimir Putin “will not win.”

“The citizens in Ukraine want democracy and freedom, and Europe’s future will be one of peace and freedom,” Chancellor Scholz said. “We will make sure of that, together with our friends and partners.”

A senior U.S. official told the Associated Press under the condition of anonymity the U.N. Security Council is expected to vote Friday on a resolution condemning Russia in the strongest terms possible. The council is also expected to demand the immediate withdrawal of all its forces. While Russia is expected to veto the resolution, the official said it is important to underscore Russia’s international isolation.

With the condemnation came more sanctions against Russia. Great Britain announced a round of financial restrictions and export controls. Canada announced sanctions that will target 58 people and entities, including members of Russia’s elite, their families and major Russian banks. President Joe Biden also announced sanctions similar to the ones in Great Britain and Canada.

“We have purposefully designed these sanctions to maximize the long term impact on Russia and to minimize the impact on the United States and our allies,” President Biden said. “We will limit Russia’s ability to do business in dollars, euros, pounds and yen to be part of the global economy… we’re going to stunt the ability of to finance and grow Russia… and we’re going to pare their ability to compete in high-tech 21st century economy. “

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