Queen Elizabeth’s death marks a time of change and continuity

Newt Gingrich
Conservative Opinion

Newt Gingrich

Former House Speaker; Chairman of Gingrich 360
Archive |

Queen Elizabeth II is the longest-reigning monarch in Britain’s history, serving an astonishing 70 years. Her death marks the end of an era and her accomplishments are many. She provided stability and reassurance for people around the world during many turbulent periods in history. Straight Arrow News contributor Newt Gingrich takes a look back, and a look forward, to the new reigning monarch, King Charles III.

In the passing of Queen Elizabeth II, the longest serving British monarch in all of history, after 70 years, is a remarkable moment. The fact that her son will become King Charles III shows you the continuity of the British system. And there was a certain, I think, poignant moment that she met with her 15th Prime Minister just before she passed away, and that Liz Truss, who clearly is going to be a conservative in the Margaret Thatcher tradition, now is the Prime Minister of Great Britain.

It’s a time of change and a time of continuity. It’s a time for looking back at this amazing woman who took office in the early 1950s. And who had his her first prime minister, Winston Churchill, a man whose own life went back into the age of Queen Victoria. And so she had had 15 different prime ministers come and visit with her in the course of her monarchy. She was a symbol for not just Great Britain, but for the entire British Commonwealth. And through that, she became a symbol really for much of the world, including millions and millions of Americans. I think people respect that at 96. She represented Great Britain, she represented the cause of freedom and the rule of law in a way that was really remarkable.

And we look forward to seeing how King Charles III works out, you know, he spent many years in his mother’s chateau. I remember though, being with him in 2019 in Rome, and remarkably pleasant and personable, and I think he will turn out to be a very popular, very hardworking King, in the tradition of his mother. At the same time, I’m very excited that finally Britain has a real conservative leader in Liz Truss, somebody who really harkens back to Margaret Thatcher and to the sound principles of lower taxes, less regulation, smaller government, more entrepreneurship.

It’s going to be a fascinating time in Great Britain. Well worth watching to see how they come to grips with their challenges, and to compare it with the rising tide of big government socialism in Washington. So I found it to be a remarkable turning point in history.

 

 

In the passing of Queen Elizabeth II, the longest serving British monarch in all of history, after 70 years, is a remarkable moment. The fact that her son will become King Charles III shows you the continuity of the British system. And there was a certain, I think, poignant moment that she met with her 15th Prime Minister just before she passed away, and that Liz Truss, who clearly is going to be a conservative in the Margaret Thatcher tradition, now is the Prime Minister of Great Britain. It’s a time of change and a time of continuity. It’s a time for looking back at this amazing woman who took office in the early 1950s. And who had his her first prime minister, Winston Churchill, a man whose own life went back into the age of Queen Victoria. And so she had had 15 Different prime ministers come and visit with her. In the course of her of her monarchy. She was a symbol for not just Great Britain, but for the entire British Commonwealth. And through that, she became a symbol really for much of the world, including millions and millions of Americans. I think people respect that at 96. She represented Great Britain, she represented the cause of freedom, and the rule of law in a way that was really remarkable.

And we look forward to seeing how King Charles III, works out, you know, he spent many years in his mother’s chateau. I remember though, being with him in 2019, in Rome, and remarkably pleasant, and personable, and I think he will turn out to be a very popular, very hardworking King, and the tradition of his mother. At the same time, I’m very excited that finally Britain has a real conservative leader in lives trust, somebody who really harkens back to Margaret Thatcher and to the sound principles of lower taxes, less regulation, smaller government, more entrepreneurship. It’s going to be a fascinating time in Great Britain. Well worth are watching to see how they come to grips with their challenges, and to compare it with the rising tide of big government socialism in Washington. So I found it to be a remarkable turning point in history.